Obama has flubbed on protecting America from Ebola since 2008

In 2008, the incoming Obama administration failed to implement all of the CDC’s advice to prevent an Ebola outbreak

The Centers for Disease Control told the incoming Obama administration in 2008 that it should establish 18 regional disease detection centers around the world to adequately safeguard the U.S. from emerging health threats like Ebola, according to an agency memo.

But six years later, as the government struggles to contain the fallout from a deadly Ebola outbreak at home and abroad, the CDC still has only 10 centers — and none of them operates in the western Africa region hardest hit by the deadly virus.

“The existing centers have already proven their effectiveness and impact on detecting and responding to outbreaks including avian influenza, aflatoxin poisoning, Rift Valley fever, Ebola and Marburg virus outbreaks,” the CDC said in its memo to the Obama transition team, which The Washington Times obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request.

At the time, the CDC had five centers set up, and has only added five more of the 13 the agency had proposed “to complete the network and properly protect the nation.”

The memo sheds new light on the problems dealing with the current Ebola crisis, which intensified with the revelations Wednesday that a second Texas nurse had tested positive for the disease and President Obama used a White House Cabinet meeting to promise a “more aggressive” federal response to the threat.

The CDC’s plan outlined in the transition memo was based on the notion that the U.S. shouldn’t wait for a disease to enter the country but rather monitor threats in hot spots overseas to try to help local public health authorities control outbreaks before then.

His agenda was transforming America into a socialist welfare state, not protecting it from deadly diseases. In other words, his goal was to infect America with his political agenda, nothing more. Certainly nothing else had a higher priority.

Tom Frieden was appointed in 2009, so the CDC still had competent leadership in 2008. Frieden’s recent remarks show that he was probably never a supporter of disease detection centers. He has said that stopping Ebola where it exists in Africa won’t work. We should be scared to death of this strange statement and the sort of muddled thinking behind it.

We can remember also the words of Rahm Emanuel [Obama’s chief of staff at the time, now Mayor of Chicago]: “You never want to let a crisis go to waste because you can do things you wouldn’t otherwise be able to do. Preventing a crisis would have interfered with the agenda.  From that perspective, a crisis is an opportunity. The more deadly the crisis the greater the opportunity to implement socialism.